Sunday, August 7, 2011

 SCOTT TAKES BRIDGESTONE
 Adam Scott, who didn’t make a bogey over his last 26 holes and couldn’t afford to with 19-year-old Ryo Ishikawa giving him all he could handle, won the Bridgestone Invitational and his first World Golf Championship.
They were never separated by more than one shot until Scott chipped in from the side of the 12th green, then rolled in a birdie putt from just inside 30 feet on the 14th to build a three-shot lead. Ishikawa three-putted the 15th, and Scott had no trouble closing this one out.

He wound up winning by four shots over world No. 1 Luke Donald, who shot 66; and Rickie Fowler, who played a final round worthy of a winner with a bogey-free 66, only to run into an affable Australian who couldn’t be beat.

Ishikawa made a bogey on the last hole to tie for fourth with Jason Day. They both shot 69. For the Japanese star, it was his highest finish in America.

Scott finished at 17-under 263, the lowest score to win at Firestone since Woods had 259 in 2000 in an 11-shot win.

After missing three months with a leg injury, he finished a tournament for the first time since the Masters on April 10 and closed with a 70 to tie for 37th, 18 shots behind.Scott became the third Australian to win a world title, joining Geoff Ogilvy and Craig Parry. He won for the 18th time in his career and moved back into the top 10 in the world ranking.



PIERCY CAPTURES FIRST PGA TOUR WIN
 Scott Piercy holed a seven-foot par putt at the 72nd hole Sunday and won the Reno-Tahoe Open by a shot over Pat Perez. Piercy picked up his first-ever PGA Tour victory and earned a spot in this week's PGA Championship. Piercy closed with a 70 at the Montreux Country Club for a 15-under par total of 273.

All Scott Piercy needed to do Sunday was two-putt the final hole at the Reno-Tahoe Open from 29 feet for his first PGA Tour victory.

clearpxl Piercy didn't make it easy on himself, he ran his first putt seven feet by then made the nervous come-back putt for his win. He closed with a 2-under par 70 and a 15-under par total of 273.


Piercy will have to change those plans as he jumped from 142nd on the money list to the PGA Championship field and also assured himself a spot in the FedEx Cup playoffs.

Piercy led by as many as three shots but a bogey at the 332-yard par-4 14th, dropped him into a tie for the lead with Perez at 15-under.

Perez gave the lead back to Piercy when he bogeyed the 17th hole with a three-putt from the fringe. Perez had a chance to get to 15-under par at the par-5 18th but missed from eight feet for birdie. He wound up solo second after shooting 68.

Blake Adams and Steve Flesch finished tied for third at 13-under 275.



HAAS WINS 3M ON FINAL HOLE
Jay Haas  two-putted from about 30 feet for birdie to win the 3M Championship Sunday, beating Tom Lehman, Kenny Perry and Peter Senior by one shot. It was his first tour victory in two years.

Haas smiled when asked how nervous he was playing the final few holes, especially the par-5 No. 18 with an approach shot over water.

“I don’t think I’ve ever been not nervous on the final hole with a chance to win,” he said. “I hope I continue to be that way.”

Haas started the day one shot behind Senior and John Huston and had a 68 to finish at 15-under 201, the highest winning score at the tournament since 2006.

Seven players were in the lead at 12 under with six holes to play.

Haas, who birdied three straight holes on the front side to get to 13 under before a bogey at No. 10, birdied No. 14 to open a two-shot lead. Perry, who missed a 1-foot par putt on the same hole, birdied No. 16 to get within one and — playing two groups in front of Haas—tied Haas with a birdie on No. 18 after his eagle attempt slid just right. Playing in the second-to-last group, Lehman also birdied No. 18 to temporarily move into a first-place tie.

Forty-six players birdied the final hole and five recorded eagles.

Perry, who has four top-10s in six Champions Tour starts, birdied three of first four holes and five of his first seven to get to 13 under, but struggled to get out a bunker on the par-4 No. 9 and recorded a double-bogey. He was 3 under on the back nine.

Hal Sutton (67) finished two shots back and Tom Watson (65) and Mark O’Meara (68) were three behind. Watson made a 70-foot eagle putt on the final hole, which was statistically the easiest hole all week.



KILLEEN WINS 2ND IN A ROW
J.J. Killeen shot a 3-under 69 to win for the second straight week on the Nationwide Tour, two-putting from 90 feet on the final hole to avoid a five-way playoff at the Cox Classic on Sunday.
The former TCU star sank a 5-footer at the last to finish at 22-under 262, edging Jonas Blixt (64), Ken Duke (66), Gary Christian (65) and former U.S. Amateur champion Danny Lee (66) at Champions Run.
Lee was in the final group with Killeen and holed a 15-foot birdie to tie the clubhouse leaders and put pressure on Killeen.

Killeen earned $130,500 for the win and is now second on the money list coming off his victory at the Utah Championship last week. The top 25 on the money list earn PGA Tour cards for next year.



 IN OTHER NEWS
Shanshan Feng broke through today for her 1st big win as a professional by prevailing over a former JLPGA money-list title-holder and an up-and-coming Korean golfer in the final round of the Meiji Chocolate Cup. 

Down 2 at the start of the day, she started off cold with a bogey on the par-3 2nd to fall 3 behind Eun-Bi Jang and remain 2 behind Miho Koga after 6 holes. But then she bounced back with a 3-hole birdie barrage that Koga couldn't match and Jang could respond to only with a corresponding birdie on the short par-5 9th, so at the turn Jang lead Feng by 1 and Koga by 2. 3 holes later, though, and the players were in a dead heat at -12, as Jang went bogey-birdie-par, Feng went par-par-birdie, and Koga went par-birdie-birdie. 

Feng put pressure on her playing partners by birdieing 2 of her next 3 holes and took a 1-shot lead onto the 16th tee when they could only respond with a single birdie each.

And she kept it up by parring out as they each made 2 bogeys in a row, so even though they both birdied the par-5 18th, it was too little, too late to stop Feng, who ended up being the only player in the field to break 70 all 3 rounds. 

Her 67 made Chie Arimura's 9-birdie 64 moot and gave her her 1st win on the JLPGA in only her 2nd start as a member.



  Adam Scott will opt out of defending his Singapore Open title to return home and join a star-studded field at November’s Australian Open.

Scott will join the likes of Tiger Woods, Jason Day, Geoff Ogilvy, Greg Norman, Fred Couples, Dustin Johnson and Bubba Watson at The Lakes from Nov. 10.

Scott told Network TEN television Thursday it was a tough decision to forego defending his title in Singapore, “but the Australian Open is really tough to pass up and I am going to be playing in Sydney.”

Scott won the 2009 Australian Open at the New South Wales Golf Club and has his sights on a second title in the event’s strongest field in years.

 U.S. Open
champion Rory McIlroy loves playing in America so much that wants to join the PGA Tour again.

McIlroy spoke to PGA Tour officials Wednesday morning and said he was leaning toward taking up his tour card next season, meaning he would play at least 15 events on the PGA Tour in 2012.

The 22-year-old from Northern Ireland said he would start looking for a place to live in Florida—either Orlando or the West Palm Beach area—after the PGA Championship next week.

McIlroy, one of the brightest young stars in golf, gave up his PGA Tour membership after 2010, saying he wasn’t interested in the travel involved to play on the PGA and European tours, and that the FedEx Cup playoffs—a big incentive to join the PGA Tour—was too much golf at the end of the summer.

He has three career wins, the biggest two in America—a 62 in the final round at Quail Hollow in 2010, and his record-setting performance in soft conditions at Congressional to win the U.S. Open by eight shots at 16-under 268.

McIlroy struggled in wind at the British Open, however, and said after his final round that he doesn’t enjoy playing in such conditions. “I’d rather play when it’s 80 degrees and sunny and not much wind,” he said at Royal St. George’s.

Asked what changed his mind about PGA Tour membership, McIlroy said it was the British Open.




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